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A Message For My Friends   2 comments

I’ve given this a lot of thought for some time now, and I’ve finally come to a decision. After nine years and 1500 posts, I’m ready to step back from all this for a while. I can’t say I won’t resurface at some point in the future, but for right now I’m going to call a halt. I’ve always promised that I wouldn’t leave you hanging by just stopping one day without letting you know first, so this is me doing that.

memay15

Maintaining a blog hovers somewhere between an enjoyable activity and a chore, and lately the needle keeps pointing closer and closer to the ‘chore’ side of the gauge. And after all, who willingly hangs on to a chore if they don’t have to?

I’m also running dry on ideas. As a sign of my desperation, I was recently thinking about combining one of our regular Special Features with a certain type of slideshow I’ve used in the past. But when I thought about the title — Saluting Silly Songs with a Silly Sign Slideshow — all those S’s reminded me of an especially sibilant snake, and a silly one at that. (Groan. Sorry.)

But let’s get on with it. I’m going on an indefinite hiatus, blog-wise, but I want to assure those folks who like to stop by from time to time, checking favorite posts or adding comments, that I will leave everything in place. And as far as I know, the good people at wordpress will leave it all active and usable for a long time to come. (Always remember, you can use the ‘search’ feature to find just about anything.)

And one more thing  — thanks, everybody!

Posted May 23, 2015 by BG in Seniors

The Redemption Of Johnny Carroll    3 comments

One of the most unappreciated rockabilly artists of the 1950s was Johnny Carroll, a talented and magnetic performer who was in many ways reminiscent of his friend, the much more successful Gene Vincent. In fact, Carroll’s surge of popularity later in his career was partly due to his appreciation for Vincent’s music, along with his own determination. And even though he never enjoyed a major hit, many of his records became favorites for knowledgeable fans world-wide and he ended up in the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.

johnnybwBorn in rural Texas as John Lewis Carrell (later changed to Carroll because of a record label misprint), he began performing on local radio as a child, and by age fifteen was leading his own band. He was still in his teens in the mid-1950s when his growing radio success led to a record contract with Decca. Some of his early records, including “Crazy Crazy Loving” and “Wild Wild Women” were solid, as was “Hot Rock” (his band was named the Hot Rocks). Also, his on-screen performance in an otherwise forgettable teen-rock movie showcased his music — and his moves — but Decca didn’t renew his contract.

Carroll was then at Sun Records in Memphis for a while, bumping into guys like Elvis, Johnny Cash, and Jerry Lee Lewis, but still didn’t find much success in record sales. As the 1950s wound down he moved back to Dallas and signed with a new agent, the same one used by Gene Vincent, who was a little older than Carroll and had already enjoyed a hit record with his classic “Be-Bop-A-Lula.” It would mark a turning point for Carroll, who soon came out with what would be his most successful record, “The Swing,” which had echoes of Vincent’s style (along with some of the same musicians in the studio).

Even though he retained some popularity in Europe, Carroll’s career was pretty much stalled by the 1960s, but he remained friends with Vincent until the latter’s death in 1971. Even more significantly, the loss of his friend inspired him to later generate a new record on a tribute song, which somewhat revitalized Carroll’s career. He was able to find a lot of success in subsequent years by performing the same style of music, and at one point in the late 1970s also recorded a brand new album that he called Texabilly. He was just 57 when he died of liver failure in 1995.

johnnycdJohnny Carroll – “The Swing”

Fantastic Foursome – Astaire Redux   Leave a comment

Today’s featured song on the GMC Special Feature known as Fantastic Foursome is another with a strong connection to Fred Astaire. For a guy who always comes to mind first and foremost as a dancer, he had quite an impact in many other ways during his long career. In this case, he not only introduced the song in a memorable movie but also had a #1 hit record with it.tophat

Irving Berlin wrote “Cheek to Cheek” for 1935’s Top Hat, one of Fred and Ginger’s best-known films. The song was nominated for an Academy Award, but lost the Oscar to “Lullaby of Broadway.” However, Astaire’s record of “Cheek To Cheek” climbed to the top of the music charts and stayed at the #1 spot for five weeks, and — in spite of missing out on the Oscar — would eventually land at the #15 spot on the AFI list of most memorable movie songs. And just for good measure, it would also eventually be inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Of course, as the years passed the song was recorded by just about everybody, and some of the best are below. You can listen to each and then — if you like — vote for your favorite in the poll below the video.

Billie HolidayEydie & SteveFrank SinatraVic Damone

1-billie2-eydiesteve3-frank4-vic

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