Country Catalyst – Aching To Sing   2 comments

It’s been over a month since our last Country Catalyst so I thought it was high time we had another. I’ll remind everybody that a Country Catalyst is a post that features a classic country song that I hope will attract some appreciation from folks who have normally NOT been fans of the genre.

jcr

Today’s offering is “Seven Year Ache,” a song that’s owned in almost every way by Roseanne Cash, who not only wrote it but also had a country chart-topper with it in 1981. Although she has had a number of other big hits, it is this song that is most closely identified with her. The record was produced by her then-husband Rodney Crowell, a country music star himself (who also appears in the video below).

As the daughter of the legendary Johnny Cash she faced the kind of expectations that many of the offspring of famous stars have found difficult to overcome, but it was obvious early on that she had plenty of talent herself. Even though her first taste of the business was working behind the scenes for her father, within a few years Roseanne was forging her own career.  She has now been a star for three decades, as both a songwriter and a performer.

Although she’s mostly been identified with country music, her style has always been bluesy and contemporary, and “Seven Year Ache” is as relevant now as it was thirty years ago.

rccdRoseanne Cash – “Seven Year Ache”

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2 responses to “Country Catalyst – Aching To Sing

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  1. An absolutely great song.

  2. Well said. 🙂

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